New York Car Accidents Kill Most Pedestrians At Only 10% of Streets

According to a story in today’s Daily News (Too many pedestrians dying on city’s meanest streets):

More than half of all pedestrian fatalities and injuries occur at 10% of city intersections, according to new data released by the advocacy group Transportation Alternatives.

A copy of the press release from the 4,000 member organization can be found here: Hundreds Rally to Demand Pedestrian Safety.

The story of so much death and injury coming from so few trouble spots reminds me of the medical malpractice problem we have, where 5.9 percent of U.S. doctors were responsible for 57.8 percent of the number of medical malpractice payments.

The tort “reformers” like to blame lawyers for the “litigation explosion.” Perhaps they should look to the source of the problems. The best way to decrease litigation is to repair or remove the instruments of injury and death.

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