Charlie Crist, Personal Injury Lawyer

You may remember Charlie Crist. He was the governor of Florida. He’s moved on from politics now and gone to work for Morgan & Morgan, the largest personal injury firm in Florida.

Ain’t nothing wrong with that. Based on what I do for a living, you would expect me to support those that fight on behalf of consumers against behemoth insurance companies that treat people like files.

But I do have a bone to pick. It’s about his 10-second commercial:

I’m Charlie Crist. If you need help sorting out your legal issues as a result of an accident or insurance dispute, visit me at Charlie@ForThePeople.com.

Now I understand it’s tough to create a quality personal injury commercial (and also tough to create a decent PI website, as I’ve discussed). But it can be done. And with that, I return you to the best PI commercials I have ever seen, from the New York firm of Trolman, Glaser & Lichtman: Power Company, Machete, and Song Stuck in Head.

And so, a note to Morgan & Morgan. You spend enormous sums of money advertising in Florida. You can do better than having a former governor do a 10-second spot that says “visit me.” If your ad agency lacks the creative juices to break out of the tired mold of “If  you’ve been injured, blah, blah, blah,” then find a new agency where people have some imagination.

(Hat tip: Mitchell Senft)

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7 Responses Leave a comment

  • Avenger 2011.5.6 at 07:07 | Quote

    Charlie Crist is the most deceptive politician ever to get elected in Florida so it is entirely appropriate that in his post-political career he finds employment with the Florida’s most famous firm of ambulance chasers.

    I don’t know how good or bad technically he will be as an attorney, but I hope potential plaintiffs seeing his ads will run to another (and better) law firm, which usually means one that doesn’t advertise on television

  • Eric Turkewitz 2011.5.6 at 07:15 | Quote

    I hope potential plaintiffs seeing his ads will run to another (and better) law firm, which usually means one that doesn’t advertise on television

    Well, the fact that a large firm advertises on television tells you nothing about the quality of an attorney’s skills (one way or the other).

    It really only tells you one thing: That they want to advertise on television.

    I just wish they would do a better job of it than this.

  • Jen 2011.5.6 at 09:04 | Quote

    That would require them caring about their image and the message that is perceived.

  • Ron Miller 2011.5.6 at 11:12 | Quote

    We have never run a television commercial and never will. I agree with you, Eric, that advertising on television tells you nothing about the law firm one way or the other.

    But I disagree with the idea that their advertising agency should come up with something better. Any personal injury lawyer commercial that shows creativity ends up being awful. Isn’t this ad about 1000% better than the garden variety ads with ambulance lights?

  • Eric Turkewitz 2011.5.6 at 12:00 | Quote

    Any personal injury lawyer commercial that shows creativity ends up being awful

    I disagree. Try watching those three ads from Trolman Glaser.

    The problem is lack of imagination.

  • gary e. rosenberg 2011.5.7 at 10:47 | Quote

    Morgan & Morgan is, I believe, the biggest ad buyer in Florida, bar none. Maybe Mr. Crist has no p.i. chops so the less said the better. Who knows?

  • It’s all upto Charlie Crist. The relationship between Crist and Morgan & Morgan personal injury law firm has raised some eyebrows because of his former role as Minister of Justice. It’s clearly known that In a series of ads, the commitment of the details of Crist to public service, and the company’s commitment to the struggle by the people.

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