This is how easy it is to e-file in New York…

New York now has mandatory e-filing for some commercial cases in New York County. (That’s the Borough of New York Manhattan, not the City or State of New York, for you out-of-towners.)

E-filing is easy, right? That’s one of the reasons we do it, right? Easy-peasy. Less paper, no more running down to the courthouse.

Ahh, I pity the poor fool that thought that.

Want to know if your commercial case is subject to mandatory e-filing? This is the definition you are looking for:

202.5-bb. Electronic Filing in Supreme Court; Mandatory Program.

….

(2) For purposes of this section:

(i) “commercial actions” shall mean actions in which at least one claim of the types described in subparagraph (1) of paragraph (B) of subdivision (b) of section 6 of chapter 367 of the laws of 1999, as amended by chapter 416 of the laws of 2009 and chapter 528 of the laws of 2010, is asserted.

Nice, huh? I can just see the law clerks that drafted that humdinger sitting around a desk laughing their asses off.

Let’s file this puppy under Legal Writing, for lack of a better place, and put it right next to these decisions with 300+ word sentences.

 

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3 Responses Leave a comment

  • d-day 2012.1.5 at 12:18 | Quote

    Could be worse. Arizona’s now-mandatory e-filing requires an 8$ “convenience” fee to file each document, payble only through Paypal. Paypal!

  • Turk Fan 2012.1.5 at 15:42 | Quote

    I think you mean the Borough of Manhattan, not “borough of New York.”

  • Eric Turkewitz 2012.1.5 at 15:51 | Quote

    I think you mean the Borough of Manhattan, not “borough of New York.”

    I’m too snarky for my own good.

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