App Court: You Ain’t Gettin’ Those Facebook Files

Another defendant attempts to get access to a personal injury plaintiff’s Facebook and other social media accounts, and another defendant is shot down by an appellate court.

This one comes out of New York’s Appellate Division (4th Department). Kregg v. Maldonado, decided a few days ago,  deals with a motorcycle accident and a suit against Suzuki. As per the court:

The Suzuki defendants moved, inter alia, to compel the disclosure of the “entire contents” of those and any other social media accounts maintained by or on behalf of the injured party. Plaintiff objected to such disclosure on the grounds of relevance and burden, contending that the demand for disclosure was a “fishing expedition.” Supreme Court agreed with the Suzuki defendants that they were entitled to such disclosure. That was error.

The authority the appellate court cited to was McAnn v. Harleysville, also a 4th Department case, which I discussed two years ago. Missing from the defendant’s demand, and the heart of the McAnn ruling, was that there had to be some “factual predicate with respect to the relevancy of the evidence.” But there wasn’t.

The defendants were, in essence, on a simple fishing expedition (or, perhaps, a billing expedition) hoping that something would come up that might contradict the plaintiff’s testimony in some way. But that is not a sufficient reason under the law to demand access to private materials.

The court ruled that:

As in McCann, the proper means by which to obtain disclosure of any relevant information contained in the social media accounts is a narrowly-tailored discovery request seeking only that social-media-based information that relates to the claimed injuries arising from the accident.

Expect to see continued attempts by defendants to pry into social medial accounts marked private, and attempts to create “factual predicates” upon which to make such demands.

Tags:

2 Responses Leave a comment

  • Old Geezer 2012.10.6 at 07:53 | Quote

    “(or, perhaps, a billing expedition)”

    Priceless!

  • [self-prmotional SEO friendly terms deleted] 2012.10.16 at 11:41 | Quote

    I think this was the right call. If the online profile is available for everyone to see, then sure, it’s fair game. But to ask for unlimited access to their entire social media history in the hopes that *something* incriminating will turn up…? A bit much, no? [self-prmotional, SEO friendly terms deleted]

Comments are closed.


The New York Personal Injury Law Blog is sponsored by its creator, Eric Turkewitz of The Turkewitz Law Firm. The blog might be considered a form of attorney advertising in accordance with New York rules going into effect February 1, 2007 (22 NYCRR 1200.1, et. seq.) As of July 14, 2008, Law.com became an advertiser, as you can see in the sidebar. Law.com does not control the editorial content of the blog in any way.

Throughout the blog as it develops, you may see examples of cases we have handled, or cases from others, that are used for illustrative purposes. Since all cases are different, and legal authority may change from year to year, it is important to remember that prior results in any particular case do not guarantee or predict similar outcomes with respect to any future matter, including yours, in which any lawyer or law firm may be retained.

Some of the commentary may be become outdated. Some might be a minority opinion, or simply wrong. No reader should consider this site (or any other) to be authoritative, and if a legal issue is presented, the reader should contact an attorney of his or her own choosing for advice.

Finally, we are not responsible for the comments of others that may be added to this site.